Guy Boyd

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Curriculum vitae

Guy Martin Boyd was born in Murrumbeena, near Melbourne in 1923. Guy Boyd hails from the illustrious artistic Boyd dynasty.
He grew up with his extended family in the idyllic environs of Murrumbeena, Victoria which served as a large, rambling studio/house where creativity was encouraged and nurtured. His penchant for sculpture became apparent during this period and at the age of twelve he made a conscious decision to become a sculptor. After experimenting with many other pursuits, most notably pottery, his ambition was realised in 1964 when he devoted himself to full-time sculpting.
After a state primary school education Guy and his brothers took labouring jobs. In 1941-46 he served in the Militia. A committed pacifist, he refused to bear arms and worked at first as a draughtsman before being transferred to Ingleburn to teach pottery to patients in 1944.
In 1945, Boyd enrolled at the East Sydney Technical College, where he studied sculpture under Lyndon Dadswell. In 1946 at Neutral Bay he founded a commercial pottery, the Martin Boyd Pottery, these products were popular with postwar homemakers.
On 22 April 1950 Boyd married 18-year-old Barbara Dawn Cooper, a secretary however they soon divorced and in 1952 Boyd moved back to Melbourne and married Phyllis Nairn, an Adelaide-born graduate in social work. While living with his family at his father's property Boyd began the Guy Boyd Pottery, however sold this in 1964 to move to Brighton and sculpt full time.
His first big commissions included wall sculptures for Tullamarine (1970) and Sydney (1971) airports. Following study in Europe and Asia, in 1976 he moved to Toronto, Canada; his wife and their youngest four children accompanied him. In 1980 Boyd bought his grandfather's house in Edward Street, Sandringham, and he returned to Melbourne with his family in 1981 to restore the house and live in it.
A former president (1973-76) of the Port Phillip Bay Conservation Council, he remained active in environmental matters: he was arrested in 1983 while protesting against the damming of the Franklin River in Tasmania and campaigned for the innocence of Lindy Chamberlain. He died on 26 April 1988.
The major themes that run through the work of Guy Boyd include symbolism, myth, lovers and women. His ability to capture the fluidity and sensuality of the human form is extraordinary. His appreciation for the female form is widely known with the execution of many beautiful works a testament to this inspirational muse. Boyd had held one-man exhibitions in all Australian capital cities and in London, Montreal, Chicago and New York. His work is represented in the National Gallery of Australia and in the State galleries of Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland.

 

Guy Boyd

Curriculum vitae

Guy Martin Boyd was born in Murrumbeena, near Melbourne in 1923. Guy Boyd hails from the illustrious artistic Boyd dynasty.
He grew up with his extended family in the idyllic environs of Murrumbeena, Victoria which served as a large, rambling studio/house where creativity was encouraged and nurtured. His penchant for sculpture became apparent during this period and at the age of twelve he made a conscious decision to become a sculptor. After experimenting with many other pursuits, most notably pottery, his ambition was realised in 1964 when he devoted himself to full-time sculpting.
After a state primary school education Guy and his brothers took labouring jobs. In 1941-46 he served in the Militia. A committed pacifist, he refused to bear arms and worked at first as a draughtsman before being transferred to Ingleburn to teach pottery to patients in 1944.
In 1945, Boyd enrolled at the East Sydney Technical College, where he studied sculpture under Lyndon Dadswell. In 1946 at Neutral Bay he founded a commercial pottery, the Martin Boyd Pottery, these products were popular with postwar homemakers.
On 22 April 1950 Boyd married 18-year-old Barbara Dawn Cooper, a secretary however they soon divorced and in 1952 Boyd moved back to Melbourne and married Phyllis Nairn, an Adelaide-born graduate in social work. While living with his family at his father's property Boyd began the Guy Boyd Pottery, however sold this in 1964 to move to Brighton and sculpt full time.
His first big commissions included wall sculptures for Tullamarine (1970) and Sydney (1971) airports. Following study in Europe and Asia, in 1976 he moved to Toronto, Canada; his wife and their youngest four children accompanied him. In 1980 Boyd bought his grandfather's house in Edward Street, Sandringham, and he returned to Melbourne with his family in 1981 to restore the house and live in it.
A former president (1973-76) of the Port Phillip Bay Conservation Council, he remained active in environmental matters: he was arrested in 1983 while protesting against the damming of the Franklin River in Tasmania and campaigned for the innocence of Lindy Chamberlain. He died on 26 April 1988.
The major themes that run through the work of Guy Boyd include symbolism, myth, lovers and women. His ability to capture the fluidity and sensuality of the human form is extraordinary. His appreciation for the female form is widely known with the execution of many beautiful works a testament to this inspirational muse. Boyd had held one-man exhibitions in all Australian capital cities and in London, Montreal, Chicago and New York. His work is represented in the National Gallery of Australia and in the State galleries of Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland.